Giannetta in The Elixir of Love, Opera Theatre St. Louis (2014)                                 

Conductor: Stephen Lord, Director: Jose Maria Condemi

 

"As Giannetta, Adina’s gossipy sidekick, soprano Leela Subramaniam displayed a dark and supple voice with a fine range, while looking altogether gorgeous." - St. Louis Today 

"In the supporting role of Giannetta, Leela Subramaniam brightens the stage with her luscious soprano and sunny presence." - Chicago Tribune

"Last but not least in the cast is the strikingly beautiful Leela Subramaniam, who brings her lovely soprano voice to the role of Giannetta. She made me wish that that role was much larger." - Broadwayworld 

"Leela Subramaniam, extraordinarily pretty, brought a dewy soprano to Giannetta's brief aria." - OperaNews

"Giannetta was strongly cast with a Gerdine Young Artist, the animated and appealing Leela Subramaniam. She made a sweet impression, her clear and characterful singing commanding plenty of firepower to include some excellent climactic high notes that rose easily above the ensemble. - Opera Today

"The role of Adina's friend Gianetta isn't a large one, but the character's voice is prominent in the opening crowd scene. Soprano Leela Subramaniam (a Gerdine Young Artist) makes a powerful first impression in that number, with a big voice that soars effortlessly over the top of the chorus. The libretto doesn't give her much to work with in creating a character, but Ms. Subramaniam has found a charmingly coquettish woman in there nevertheless." -  KDHX independent music 

"Another standout is Leela Subramaniam, a soprano who possesses a voice of remarkable clarity and richness in the role of Giannetta." - Riverfront Times

"Similarly, Adina’s confidant and town busybody Giannetta is played by the stunning and delightful soprano Leela Subramaniam." - Alive Magazine 

"Leela Subramaniam commanded attention in the small role of Giannetta."- Wall Street Journal

 

Angelica in Haydn's Orlando Paladino, Manhattan School of Music (2014)                   

Director: Robin Guarino, Conductor: Christian Capocaccia

 

"Leela Subramaniam, a soprano, proved even more touching as Angelica, especially when contemplating suicide as a way to rejoin Medoro, missing and presumed dead. Ms. Subramaniam's lovely tone retained its luster even when taxed to the full in arduous, altitudinous vocal flights." - New York Times

"Leela Subramaniam had the prima donna role of Angelica of Cathay, unhappy object of Orlando's attentions, a part that included one and half suicide attempts and much vocal display. Her sound has more body, more distinction, than many young sopranos." - Parterre 

"As Angelica, Leela Subramaniam displayed an impressive young voice that flew fearlessly into the high tessitura of the part, singing Haydn's athletic vocal lines with agility and grace." - Superconductor 

"Soprano Leela Subramaniam ... sailed through Angelica's coloratura and high notes with steely accuracy and glee and portrayed the character's narcissistic nymphomania with vocal assurance." - Opera News 

 

Thaïs in Massenet's Thaïs, Manhattan School of Music (2013)                                      

Conductor: George Manahan, Director: Renaud Doucet

 

"Leela Subramaniam gave a memorable performance as Thaïs on December 5. More impressive even than her gleaming, pitch-perfect soprano was her complete, internalized understanding of her character. Everything about her changed when she made the transition from courtesan to penitent: her body language, her demeanor, her gestures. One of her most arresting moments was purely non-vocal. During the famous 'Meditation,' played with exquisite, quivering beauty by concertmaster Christina Bouey, Subramaniam revealed the vulnerability lurking beneath the surface of her confident, powerful sensuality as she moved from rage to desperation to acceptance." - Opera News

"Leela Subramaniam and Yunpeng Wang, looking plausibly combustible, both used suitably fresh and elastic voices in stylish, musically informed ways. " - GayCity News

"For his leading lady, the composer devised coolly elegant melodies, as if she were being glimpsed through a veil. Leela Subramaniam’s silvery soprano proved an ideal fit for all … and her sultry pout was worthy of the young Madonna." - NY Post

 

Niece 1 in Peter Grimes at Carnegie Hall, St. Louis Symphony (2013)                          

Conductor: David Robertson, with Anthony Dean Griffey as Peter Grimes and Susanna Phillips as Ellen Orford

 

"The cast was excellent in every part, secondary and tertiary, all the voices beautiful and clear. Even the Nieces — Leela Subramaniam and Summer Hassan — were a pleasure to hear, and everyone was fully in character. " - New York Classical Review

 

 

Annu in the World Premiere of Thumbprint, Beth Morrison Projects/PROTOTYPE Festival (2014)

Conductor: Steven Osgood, Director: Rachel Dickstein

 

"Leela Subramaniam displayed a piercingly lovely soprano as her sister"  - Wall Street Journal

"Also an amazing performer is Leela Subramaniam who plays Muktar's younger sister, who fears that her sister's shame will prevent her from getting married." - Mark Savitt, "Hi! Drama"

 

Verdi Square Festival of the Arts, Verdi Square in New York City (2013)

 

"Leela Subramaniam, soprano, exuded confidence and power almost toying with the audience with her impressive range and she knew she had them in her power. Such beauty and depth in her rendition of “Caro Nome” from Verdi’s Rigoletto." - The Windsor Square 

 

Nerone in Handel's Agrippina, University of California-Los Angeles (2011)                     

Director: James Darrah, Conductor: Stephen Stubbs

 

"Subramaniam's pleasant soprano …. nailed the immature character of Nerone." -Huffington Post/ LA Opus

 

Sœur Constance in Dialogues of the Carmelites (French), Chautauqua Institution (2013)     

Director: John Giampetro

 

"At the monastery she meets Sister Constance, the next-youngest nun in the monastery. Leela Subramaniam played Constance with a delightfully girlish air that served as a much-needed foil to Blanche’s self-imposed misery." - Chautauqua Daily